World

Jamie Lee Curtis marks 25 years of being ‘clean and sober’


Jamie Lee Curtis is celebrating 25 years of sobriety.

The Oscar winner marked the milestone on Saturday, posting a photo of herself on Instagram holding a small chip engraved with the words “JLC Twenty Five.”In the caption, Curtis, 65, wrote that she has been “clean and sober” for 25 years.

“One day at a time. 9,125 of them,” she wrote. “What’s inside, as my old friend Adam sang, is a sense of calm, serenity, purpose and the greatest feeling that I am not alone. That many others share the same disease and solution.”

She added, “For all those struggling with addiction and shame, there are others out here who care. My hand in yours. Our hands in yours. XO JLC.”

Celebrity friends and followers including John Stamos, Tyra Banks and Linda Evangelista, among others, flocked to the comment section of the post to show their support.

“I’m so F’n proud of you. Your greatest achievement! Beats the Oscar,” Stamos wrote, while Banks added, “Yes!!!!.”

Evangelista, meanwhile, commented simply with celebratory sparkle and raised hands emoji.

Curtis has been open about her sobriety journey in the past. In an interview with “Morning Joe” last year, she recalled her past experience with opioid addiction, saying that “her worst day was almost invisible to anyone else” and that she was “lucky” not to have ended up in a different situation.

“I didn’t make terrible decisions high or under the influence that then, for the rest of my life, I regret[ted],” she said at the time.

Curtis has also been transparent about her family’s history of substance abuse. Her late father, actor Tony Curtis, used alcohol, cocaine and heroin throughout his life, and her half-brother Nicholas Curtis died from a heroin overdose in 1994 at the age of 23.

“I’m breaking the cycle that has basically destroyed the lives of generations in my family,” Curtis told People in 2018. “Getting sober remains my single greatest accomplishment … bigger than my husband, bigger than both of my children and bigger than any work, success, failure. Anything.”

If you or someone close to you needs help for a substance use disorder, call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or visit FindTreatment.gov, SAMHSA’s Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator.




Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button